Where Mobile Fits In The Marketing Cloud

By Tom Farrell

As most of us are well aware, mobile isn’t so much changing the world as sitting back in its chair congratulating itself on a job well done. Consumer habits have been changed utterly by the rise of the smartphone, to the extent that according to eMarketer research the average adult in the USA spends 3.1 hours of each day on their phone, and most of that time in apps. And those of us with teenage children are probably pinching ourselves in disbelief that that number isn’t significantly higher.

For brands, and more specifically the people who are responsible for communicating on their behalf, all this matters a lot. At this point I could write long screeds about exactly why, but ultimately it all boils down to two very simple and easy to understand facts:

  • The actions that consumers take, from which we learn about their tastes and preferences, now take place primarily on mobile.
  • Consumers carry around with them a personal digital device that is the single best way to communicate with them.

And whilst mobile may indeed have changed the world, the world of marketing is struggling to catch up.

That is simple enough to understand, but it changes fundamentally the nature of the digital marketing challenge, or indeed the marketing challenge full-stop. And whilst mobile may indeed have changed the world, the world of marketing is struggling to catch up.

The Marketing Cloud: Where We Stand Today

Many moons ago marketing was easy, mainly because nobody could figure out that most of it didn’t work. Things moved on, of course, but only so far. We now have a greater understanding of what works and what doesn’t, but still struggle to deliver real engagement with consumers – and a lot of that is to do with the rise of the smartphone. Again, there are probably two main factors at play.

Firstly, the smartphone is just the latest development in an ongoing trend in which the individual has greater control of the conversation. Historically, marketing was based on interruption. The company found out what TV program you liked to watch, and inserted an advert in the middle of it. More scientifically, they might discover which newspaper people more likely to buy their product would read – and then interrupt their enjoyment of that newspaper with print advertising. And crucially, there was very little the consumer could do.

Things are very different today. In the modern digital world, consumers tend to order up their entertainment, edification and other services as they require them. Interruption in that context is more aggressive and less effective. The techniques that marketers are used to are in danger of becoming not just ineffective, but actually damaging to the brand.

The techniques that marketers are used to are in danger of becoming not just ineffective, but actually damaging to the brand.

Secondly, most organizations simply don’t have the skills, experience and technology to deliver compelling campaigns in the native mobile environment. We have an infrastructure and mindset that was first built for broadcast and considers Go to the full article.

Source:: Business 2 Community

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