Where Does Relocation Fit into Your Job Search Materials?

By Amanda Clark

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There are many people who are not tied to where they live and are open to exploring different cities and states. Perhaps they’re even eager to relocate and have a change of scenery. Other people know they’ll be moving soon due to a spouse’s job or because they want to be closer to family. Whatever the reason, relocating is not unusual. However, it can make finding a job more difficult when you’re in limbo.

It’s no surprise that many companies prefer to hire locally because it’s less hassle. They don’t have to worry about waiting for someone to move or paying relocation expenses. It’s easier to get them onsite for interviews more quickly too. At the same time, depending on the job, companies are also willing to hire from out of the area for the right candidate. Your job is to show that you’re worth their time and investment – and that you’re serious about relocating.

But how can you show this through your resume and cover letter?

In Your Cover Letter …

Your cover letter is one of the best places to address relocation because it is more flexible and has a less rigid structure than a resume. You have the opportunity to show your enthusiasm, openly address the fact that you’re open to moving (or already in the process), and drive home some points about why you’re a great fit for the role and company.

Unless the company specifically mentions that they cover (or help with) relocation, it is not a good idea to assume they do. You may want to mention that you’re relocating at your own expense or are willing to incur all expenses associated with relocating for the position. This can help to clear up any concerns off the bat.

In Your Resume …

There isn’t as much opportunity to address relocation in your resume, but you can incorporate it into your summary statement at the top. Add a quick note along the lines of “seeking to relocate to Denver,” “In the process of relocating to Dallas,” or “Relocating to New York City in [month/year].”

Though it can be tempting to leave off your current address, or use a friend’s who happens to live in the city you want to move to, this can be a big mistake. The last thing you want is for an employer to find out you’ve lied on your resume. If you lie about something as simple as your address, they may wonder what else you’re being dishonest about. Plus, if you say you live in the city already and they call you in for an interview, it can put you in an awkward position to have to explain why you can’t be there immediately. Furthermore, they’ll likely be able to tell that you don’t live locally anyway by where your current job is located. It’s better to be honest from the start and simply state that you are relocating.

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Source:: Business 2 Community

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