Pokmon Go Never Went Away. Neither Did Its Technical Woes


Pokmon Go was an international phenomenon last fall, sending players wandering streets and parks to capture little creatures displayed on their smartphones. Months later, after Pokmon hysteria dissipated and manic crowds dispersed, only the most devoted players remain. And it turns out there are millions of themsome of whom will even turn up for a festival in Chicago.

About 60 million people still play Pokmon Go each month, according to data from mobile app research firm Apptopia, and one in five of those players opens the game on a daily basis. Over the past year, the research firm found, the app has been downloaded 755 million times and has earned more than $1.2 billion in revenue since its July 2016 debut.

That durable popularity, even after nonplayers stopped reading about the game in trend stories, helps explain why thousands of hardcore players flocked to Chicago’s Grant Park this past weekend to take part in a sold-out festival. Ticket-holders were promised the chance to catch rare monsters and hang with other fans wearing Pikachu costumes and Magikarp helmets.

Pokmon Go was an international phenomenon last fall, sending players wandering streets and parks to capture little creatures displayed on their smartphones. Months later, after Pokmon hysteria dissipated and manic crowds dispersed, only the most devoted players remain. And it turns out there are millions of themsome of whom will even turn up for a festival in Chicago.

About 60 million people still play Pokmon Go each month, according to data from mobile app research firm Apptopia, and one in five of those players opens the game on a daily basis. Over the past year, the research firm found, the app has been downloaded 755 million times and has earned more than $1.2 billion in revenue since its July 2016 debut.

That durable popularity, even after nonplayers stopped reading about the game in trend stories, helps explain why thousands of hardcore players flocked to Chicago’s Grant Park this past weekend to take part in a sold-out festival. Ticket-holders were promised the chance to catch rare monsters and hang with other fans wearing Pikachu costumes and Magikarp helmets.

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