Did Donald Trump’s ‘The Art Of The Deal’ Tell People Lying Three Times Makes People Believe It?

By Shawn Rice

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Flickr

President Donald Trump did not write that if “you tell people a lie three times, they will believe anything” contrary to a circulating meme on social media. According to the false meme, Trump wrote in “The Art of the Deal” that if you tell people a lie three times, they will believe it. But there is no record of this quote. Where did this false meme originate?

The image featuring a statement allegedly taken from Trump’s 1987 book The Art of the Deal, about how to get people to believe a lie, was circulated on social media in May 2016 after the quote was posted by The Hayride a conservative political commentary site.

However, the passage “You tell people a lie three times, they will believe anything. You tell people what they want to hear, play to their fantasies, and then you close the deal” does not appear in Trump’s The Art of the Deal. Snopes reported that there was no record of Trump ever having stated or written it elsewhere.

Here are some examples of people attributing the quote to Trump on social media.

“You tell people a LIE three times and they will believe anything. You tell them what they want to hear…The truth is optional.” – Trump

— Robert #Resist Sandy (@frodofied) March 4, 2017

@PrincessBravato Remember – trump’s own book says “lie to ppl three times and they’ll believe it” That’s what’s going on. DEPLORABLE

— Angie (@angieggr28) March 5, 2017

@foxandfriends @jonallendc Donald Trump wrote in “The Art of the Deal” that if you tell people a lie three times, they will believe it.

— ken (@kbialick) April 18, 2017

@realDonaldTrump This is how a demagogue maintains power. “You tell people a lie three times, they will believe anything.” -Donald Trump.

— Kyle Weems (@axlrollz) February 16, 2017

The closest match to this thought that is expressed The Art of the Deal has to do with exaggeration, not lying. Whether, the meme’s creator was intending to refer to this portion of the book is not yet determined.

“The final key to the way I promote is bravado. I play to people’s fantasies. People may not always think big themselves, but they can still get very excited by those who do. That’s why a little hyperbole never hurts. People want to believe something is the biggest and the greatest and the most spectacular.

I call it truthful hyperbole. It’s an innocent form of exaggeration — and a very effective form of promotion.”

The quote wrongly attributed to Trump is a variation of a propaganda technique known as “the big lie,” which Adolf Hitler described in his memoir Mein Kampf as follows:

“All this was inspired by the principle – which is quite true in itself – that in the big lie there is always a certain force of credibility; because the broad masses of a nation are always more Go to the full article.

Source:: Business2Community

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