Clinton Foundation Sending Water to Houston for $7 A Bottle Following Hurricane Harvey Is Fake News

By Erica Abbott

Reports that the Clinton Foundation sent water to Houston for $7 a bottle following Hurricane Harvey are false. Rumors that the humanitarian organization was benefitting their own foundation under the guise of “flood relief” efforts stemmed from a self-described “whimsical satire” website.

According to PolitiFact, the fake claim originated on Our Land of the Free, a website known for publishing fake news and satire. The article claimed that the Clinton Foundation was providing water to Harvey victims for $7 a bottle, which would result in hundreds of millions of dollars being brought back to their charity. It purported:

The Clinton Foundation is using an outdated rule for non-profits that states that they “have the right to compete in the free market regardless of who the competition is.” What that translates to is, “Since the guy on the corner is fleecing the terrified storm survivor for $7 per bottle, that’s what we get to charge the federal government.

And they’re paying it.

The Clintons stand to bring hundreds of millions of dollars into their foundation for “flood relief” that they can funnel to themselves as administrative costs and “salaries.”

The report, however, is entirely fabricated. Last month, the Clinton Foundation did offer ways to support those affected by the catastrophic flooding, but that, of course, did not include any deceitful plans to funnel millions of dollars back into their organization or charge $7 for a bottle of water. Our Land of the Free clearly states in their disclaimer that their articles are not meant to be taken seriously:

Ourlandofthefree.com makes no guarantee that anything you find here will be based at all in reality. All posts should be considered satirical and all images photoshopped to look like something they’re not. It’s not you, it’s me.

In the wake of Harvey, which made landfall on Aug. 25 and was later downgraded to a tropical storm, Texas officials did report price-gouging and scams. CNN reported that one convenience store in Houston was charging $8.50 for a bottle of water and $99 for an entire case. Best Buy also faced backlash for charging $42 for a case of bottled water, while Amazon sellers were accused of hiking prices prior to Hurricane Irma.

Here are some examples of people sharing the fake story on social media:

Social Media Shares Fake Story about Clinton Foundation Sending Water to Houston for $7 A Bottle

Unbelievable, if true . . . BREAKING: Clinton Foundations Sends Water To Houston…For $7 A Bottle https://t.co/pywfPhDwSn

— Deadeye (@Deadeyeca) August 31, 2017

https://t.co/vdFssnt29K
How audacious is this, sending water to the flood victims at £7 dollars a pop! Unbelievable

— Denise Larsen (@deniselarsen57) September 3, 2017

Well, this doesn’t sound good at all! https://t.co/5PrzhhcNKl

— Dawn Torrey (@DawnTorrey1) September 1, 2017

Love Trumps Hate….but not money. https://t.co/CBRD8zcyaJ

— Mister Fuman (@Mister_Fuman) September 1, 2017

Clintons stealing from the taxpayers again: sent bottles of water Go to the full article.

Source:: Business 2 Community

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